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Kitten Has Diarrhea But Acts Normal: What To Do?

Katelyn Son
By Katelyn Son
Medically reviewed by Ivana Crnec, DVM
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Is Kittens Having Diarrhea Normal?

Kitten Has Diarrhea But Acts Normal: What To Do?

No, kitten diarrhea is not generally normal.

Usually, diarrhea is a symptom of a more severe underlying condition. The causes of diarrhea are numerous and, although uncommon, in severe cases, can be life-threatening.

However, sometimes “kitten has diarrhea but acts normal” is a possible scenario.

Why Does My Kitten Have Diarrhea But Acting Normal?

Common causes of diarrhea are often neither urgent nor particularly harmful. If your kitten has diarrhea but acts normal, it may be because of the following conditions:

  • Indigestion. A kitten might eat something that upsets its stomach, or it might be experiencing a new food allergy brought on by a change in the cat’s diet. Dietary indiscretions and diet changes can irritate the gastrointestinal tract and make the new kitten have diarrhea.
  • Food Allergies. If a kitten is experiencing food allergies, the effects might only last a short time. Diarrhea may be the only side effect of a kitten food allergy, and the kitten can otherwise act normal when experiencing allergy symptoms, even in kittens with a sensitive stomach.
  • Intestinal Parasites. Things like Giardia and intestinal worms such as roundworm, tapeworm, and hookworm can all cause diarrhea and exist with few, if any, other symptoms, at least for a short while.
  • Side Effects. Diarrhea may be a side effect of vaccines or antibiotic treatment. If your kitten has recently received a vaccine or is on an antibiotic treatment, it can experience frequent and loose stools as a side effect but otherwise be unencumbered.
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Should I Be Worried If My Kitten Has Diarrhea But Is Acting Fine?

No, you should not be immediately worried about your kitten’s diarrhea, especially if your kitten has diarrhea but acts normal.

Since there are many possible causes of diarrhea, it may take some monitoring over a day or two before you should worry.

Observe your kitten’s behavior and litter box habits to see if they worsen or if their symptoms go on for an extended period of time. If their diarrhea persists for more than 24-48 hours, it is likely a good idea to see a DVM about causes and treatments.

What Can You Give a Kitten to Stop Diarrhea?

There are several things you can use if your kitten has diarrhea but acts normal.

Honest Paws Pre+ Probiotic. This prebiotic and probiotic formula is safe for use on both dogs and cats and is made using inulin and solarplast as the active ingredients. It contains 5 billion CFUs per 50 mg and six probiotic strains for maximum effect.

Inactive ingredients include chicken flavor and rice hull for taste and fiber content. It is made in the USA and has earned the NASC quality seal, so you can be assured the product is made with the highest standards.

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Rx Vitamins Rx Clay Powder Anti Gas & Anti Diarrhea. This supplement uses clay to absorb excess moisture in a cat’s GI tract to relieve diarrhea and constipation. It is safe for kittens older than 12 weeks and is sold in a convenient to use powder form that can be added to a cat’s food.

The main ingredient is sourced directly from the earth and also aids in gas and indigestion relief. It is free of heavy metals and is sterilized to provide the best protection and quality.

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Nutri-Vet Anti-Diarrhea Liquid. The pectin in this formula helps to protect the intestinal membranes to soothe irritated bowels in cats with diarrhea. Kaolin is used to absorb excess water in the cat’s intestines and prevent watery stools while adding bulk to the cat’s feces and making bowel movements easier.

This anti-diarrheal is ultimately designed to slow down the movement of stool through the cat to prevent bouts of diarrhea. It is made in the USA, is formulated by veterinarians, and carries the NASC quality seal.

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HomeoPet Feline Digestive Upsets Supplement. Only natural and safe ingredients were used to make this digestive supplement. It is meant to be given orally three times daily for maximum support.

It was formulated by a veterinarian specifically to ease minor digestive issues like gas, diarrhea, and constipation. It contains 90 doses per bottle and is safe and effective in cats of all ages.

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Does Kitten Diarrhea Resolve on its Own?

Kitten Has Diarrhea But Acts Normal: What To Do?

Yes, a kitten’s diarrhea can resolve on its own.

In fact, in most cases, when a kitten has diarrhea but acts normal, the episode will resolve on its own. Diarrhea is often caused by a temporary upset of the digestive system.

This can be triggered by bad food, allergies, or contaminated water. If it does not go away by itself, there are a number of prescription & over-the-counter medications and home remedies.

When Should I Take My Kitten to the Vet for Diarrhea?

If your kitten has experienced diarrhea for more than 24-48 hours, it is time to see a vet, but there are numerous other signs that it is time to see a vet. We have listed some of them here:

It is imperative your kitten sees a vet if these symptoms present themselves because they could be signs of more serious diarrhea-causing illnesses, including but not limited to:

  • Feline leukemia
  • Feline immunodeficiency virus
  • Salmonella
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Infections brought on by fleas
  • Viral infections
  • Bacterial infections
  • Feline panleukopenia virus
  • Foreign objects lodged in the cat’s digestive tract.